Mini-Reviews – “The Gateway Drug to Literacy”

Hi all! Now, if you’ve ever heard the above Art Spiegelman quote, then you have an inkling of what we’re talking about today….that’s right! Comics!

More specifically, I will be introducing you to six of my favorite Webcomics. All the titles are links to the first comic, in case you’d like to check them out. 🙂

Unshelved (Gene Ambaum & Bill Barnes)

12-12-2017 1-45-51 PMUnshelved is about a librarian named Dewey (yes, the pun IS intentional 😉 ). It’s a fun look at the ins and outs of daily library life. I will admit that since I’ve worked in a library, this might be more funny for me than the average person, but if you are reading this blog, odds are you’ve spent a fair share of time in a library yourself, so I think most of you will enjoy it too. 😉

Gunnerkrigg Court (Tom Siddell)

Strange-Adventures-GunnerkriggCourt

Gunnerkrigg Court is part mystery, part creepy fantasy, and part boarding school tale. I’m not super far into it yet, but so far we’ve had demon-y shadow things, robots, creepy teachers, and a Minotaur. Color me intrigued.

Weregeek (Alina Pete & Layne Myhre)

weregeekWeregeek is about a guy named Mark, who discovers that he is a geek after he “geeks out” and ends up in a comic book store, which leads to him joining a role-playing group. It makes more sense in the strip, lol.

Being somewhat of a voyeur when it comes to RPGs (I am TERRIBLE at playing myself, but love to watch), I really enjoy this comic. It’s fun seeing what the group gets up to in their games. There IS some romance and what not as well, but I enjoy it most for the geeky stuff. 😉

Order of the Stick (Rich Burlew)

12-12-2017 1-19-42 PM

Order if the Stick is basically a D&D party drawn as mostly stick figures. They go on epic adventures, fight lots of monsters and other baddies, save the day (sometimes), and get themselves into trouble. It’s great fun.

Rice Boy (Evan Dahm)

12-12-2017 2-00-51 PMRice Boy is…hard to describe. I’m not all the way through it yet, so I can only really say that it’s about a little guy named Rice Boy who goes on an adventure in order to fulfill a prophecy. He’s recruited by The One Electric, who is a man with a TV for a head. And is chased by a robot named Golgo. It’s odd, but interesting.

And my favorite:

Questionable Content (Jeph Jacques)

Ah, Questionable Content, how I love thee. And how I need to get caught up! Goodness. I went to the site to get the link for you all and didn’t recognize ANY of the characters in today’s comic! ::shakes finger at face:: “Bad Jessica!”

qc-feat

Ahem…anyway…QC is about a group of friends who live in Rhode Island. The author calls it “an internet comic strip about romance and robots”, which is true, though there is a lot more going on than just romance and robots. It’s mainly about the ups and downs of life and how you can always count on your friends…but its WAY funnier than I’m making it sound. I mean…

Espressosaurus

Seriously, I recommend this webcomic to everyone. It doesn’t have a whole lot of action, but the writing is great and the artist has really evolved since the beginning.

Also, because Hannelore…

Questionable-Content-Wallpaper-web-comics-24463162-281-500

Note: This list is pretty much all the comics I read that have a story line (even if it isn’t initially obvious), but I also read quite a few strip versions that I didn’t include because the post was getting REALLY long. Here are a handful that you might like to check out: Sarah’s Scribbles, The Awkward Yeti, The Oatmeal, Hyperbole & a Half, Cyanide & Happiness, and xkcd.


What are some of YOUR favorite webcomics?

Advertisements

T5W – You’re A Mean One…

Hello all! Today’s Top 5 Wednesday topic is: Bookish Things You’re a Grinch About

Hmm..bookish pet peeves, eh? I’ve got quite a few of those. ::rubs hands menacingly::

Movie Covers

Look, I understand the concept: once a book is made into a movie, a lot of people will think of it as “the book of that movie I like”, so why not market to those people to try to sell more copies, right? It’s just SO IRRITATING. Especially when you are only halfway through the series and the publisher switches to ONLY movie covers, so your series is half of one and half of the other.

Defacing Books

Having recently rediscovered my love of the library, I run into this ALL THE TIME. Dog-eared pages, notes scrawled in the margins, underlines, covers that have been folded back so far that I don’t understand how the spine still works! It’s really annoying. If it’s your own personal copy, fine, do what you want to it. But if it’s a library book or, heaven forbid, a book I lent to you…remember the golden rule of ‘borrowing’: leave it better than you found it.

Jumping POVs

I get it, you want to show the story from everyone’s point of view, right? Change things up, keep the reader on their toes. Help the reader understand all the characters better. Fine, but at least keep it to only two or three characters. Don’t jump between fifteen people. Don’t make EVERY chapter a new person. And, for goodness’ sake, LABEL THE FRICKIN’ POVS!!!!!

Distracted Women

So, I know this happens (occasionally) with male characters too, but the amount of female characters I’ve seen get distracted from whatever they are supposed to be accomplishing because some hot guy showed up is INSANE. Trying to figure out who murdered your best friend? “I wonder if that hot detective is single?” Trying to save the universe? “This might be the last time I see you, person I just met, so we should totally hook up. The universe can wait.” It’s completely ridiculous. Maybe focus on the task at hand and worry about your love life later.

Which leads me to…

Romance in EVERYTHING

About a year ago, I tasked one of my reading groups with a challenge: “Please suggest to me a book that: 1) has a female main character, 2) is Adult/Young Adult reading level, and 3) HAS ZERO ROMANCE IN IT. No hook-ups, no longing glances, no sexual tension, NOTHING.” Do you know how many responses I got that followed all the criteria? ONE. Out of over a HUNDRED people. Why on earth does every single story have to have romance in it? Why do I have to hit up the children’s section at my library to find a book without it? Is romance really that permeating in every day life, that I can name on one hand the number of adult books I’ve found without it?


So how about you? What are some of YOUR bookish pet peeves?

What’cha Readin’?

My librarians are AWESOME! I popped in a couple of weeks ago and while I was there I requested a book. They must have ordered it IMMEDIATELY because it was available for me to pick up on Friday!

This fabulous event caused me to want to check in with all of you, share my current TBR pile, and see what you guys are reading.

My Library Book:

Furiously Happy (Jenny Lawson)

Description from Goodreads: In LET’S PRETEND THIS NEVER HAPPENED, Jenny Lawson baffled readers with stories about growing up the daughter of a taxidermist. In her new book, FURIOUSLY HAPPY, Jenny explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. And terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.

furiouslyhappyAccording to Jenny: “Some people might think that being ‘furiously happy’ is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he’s never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos.”

“Most of my favorite people are dangerously fucked-up but you’d never guess because we’ve learned to bare it so honestly that it becomes the new normal. Like John Hughes wrote in The Breakfast Club, ‘We’re all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it.’ Except go back and cross out the word ‘hiding.'”

Jenny’s first book, LET’S PRETEND THIS NEVER HAPPENED, was ostensibly about family, but deep down it was about celebrating your own weirdness. FURIOUSLY HAPPY is a book about mental illness, but under the surface it’s about embracing joy in fantastic and outrageous ways-and who doesn’t need a bit more of that?

Why I Picked It: Jenny Lawson is one of those hard-to-find authors who can talk about really terrible things without depressing the crap out of you (think Allie Brosh, but in novel form). I stumbled across her first book, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened”, at the very beginning of my 2015 reading challenge and it was brilliant. I’ve been following her blog since and she is completely hilarious. I’m only about 40 pages into this book so far and I am definitely happy that I requested it (and that my librarians are so awesome).

My Christmas Reads:

The Guardians: Nicholas St. North and the Battle of the Nightmare King; E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth’s Core!; Toothiana, Queen of the Tooth Fairy Armies (William Joyce)

Description from Goodreads: This boxed set of the first three Guardians books is the perfect companion to the Rise of the Guardians movie!

guardiansOf course you know the Guardians. You’ve known them since before you can remember and you’ll know them till your memories are like twilight: Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, and the others. But where did they come from? How did they become beloved and worthy of holidays? And what nefarious evildoer prompts them to band together and protect the children of the world?

Answers are revealed and imaginations unfurl in this this treasure trove of a boxed set. Both a standalone collectible and the ideal complement to the mesmerizing Dreamworks Animation movie Rise of the Guardians, this set includes the first three titles in the Guardians chapter book series: Nicholas St. North and the Battle of the Nightmare King, E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth’s Core!, and Toothiana, Queen of the Tooth Fairy Armies.

Why I Picked It: Ok, fess up time. I LOVE the Rise of the Guardians movie. Like, seriously love it. Like, “I could put it on in the morning and replay it all day” love it. I know, I know, it’s a kids movie. But WHAT A KIDS MOVIE! It’s extremely well done and a totally unique re-imagining of characters I’ve always loved. And, yeah, reading the books AFTER the watching the movie can be dangerous territory…but I’m gonna give it a go anyway. 😉


So what are you guys currently reading? Have any holiday books lined up?

A Tribute to Cat Winters

Well, this is a bit of a diversion for me, but I just finished ‘Odd & True’ and felt the need to sing my praises for the author: Cat Winters.

I have never found a Cat Winters book that wasn’t binge-worthy. Granted, I’ve only read 3 of her novels so far, but that’s still really impressive. So I thought I would give you my thoughts on the books I’ve read and introduce everyone to this fabulous author!

In The Shadow of Blackbirds

13112915Description from Goodreads: In 1918, the world seems on the verge of apocalypse. Americans roam the streets in gauze masks to ward off the deadly Spanish influenza, and the government ships young men to the front lines of a brutal war, creating an atmosphere of fear and confusion. Sixteen-year-old Mary Shelley Black watches as desperate mourners flock to séances and spirit photographers for comfort, but she herself has never believed in ghosts. During her bleakest moment, however, she’s forced to rethink her entire way of looking at life and death, for her first love—a boy who died in battle—returns in spirit form. But what does he want from her?

My Review: This was my first Cat Winters novel and, boy, did it catch me by surprise! The description sounded interesting, but I didn’t realize I’d become enthralled enough to read it in one sitting! The author combines true history (the horror of WWI and the Spanish Influenza outbreak) and a supernatural romance…and manages to come out with a wonderful and completely believable tale.

The Cure for Dreaming

curefordreamingDescription from Goodreads: Olivia Mead is a headstrong, independent girl—a suffragist—in an age that prefers its girls to be docile. It’s 1900 in Oregon, and Olivia’s father, concerned that she’s headed for trouble, convinces a stage mesmerist to try to hypnotize the rebellion out of her. But the hypnotist, an intriguing young man named Henri Reverie, gives her a terrible gift instead: she’s able to see people’s true natures, manifesting as visions of darkness and goodness, while also unable to speak her true thoughts out loud. These supernatural challenges only make Olivia more determined to speak her mind, and so she’s drawn into a dangerous relationship with the hypnotist and his mysterious motives, all while secretly fighting for the rights of women. 

My Review: Coming off the Blackbirds book, I had a feeling this one would be better than it sounded, and I was right! It was another single-sitting, page-turner! Once again, the author manages to join together real history and the supernatural into a story that feels completely true to life. She really seems to understand (and explain well) what living in the early 1900s must have been like for a strong-minded young woman.

Odd & True

oddandtrueDescription from Goodreads: Trudchen grew up hearing Odette’s stories of their monster-slaying mother and a magician’s curse. But now that Tru’s older, she’s starting to wonder if her older sister’s tales were just comforting lies, especially because there’s nothing fantastic about her own life—permanently disabled and in constant pain from childhood polio.

In 1909, after a two-year absence, Od reappears with a suitcase supposedly full of weapons and a promise to rescue Tru from the monsters on their way to attack her. But it’s Od who seems haunted by something. And when the sisters’ search for their mother leads them to a face-off with the Leeds Devil, a nightmarish beast that’s wreaking havoc in the Mid-Atlantic states, Tru discovers the peculiar possibility that she and her sister—despite their dark pasts and ordinary appearances—might, indeed, have magic after all.

My Review: Sigh, another great one. I love how the author always manages to spin a tale that seems creepy and supernatural, but often has real issues and struggles at the heart of it. This one is more of a coming-of-age tale; that time in everyone’s life when the magic dies and reality sets in…but only if you let it.

Her other books (which my library doesn’t have, darnit) include:

The Uninvited

theuninvitedDescription from Goodreads: Twenty-five year old Ivy Rowan rises from her bed after being struck by the flu, only to discover the world has been torn apart in just a few short days. But Ivy’s life-long gift—or curse—remains. For she sees the uninvited ones—ghosts of loved ones who appear to her, unasked, unwelcomed, for they always herald impending death. On that October evening in 1918 she sees the spirit of her grandmother, rocking in her mother’s chair. An hour later, she learns her younger brother and father have killed a young German out of retaliation for the death of Ivy’s older brother Billy in the Great War.

Horrified, she leaves home, to discover the flu has caused utter panic and the rules governing society have broken down. Ivy is drawn into this new world of jazz, passion, and freedom, where people live for the day, because they could be stricken by nightfall. But as her ‘uninvited guests’ begin to appear to her more often, she knows her life will be torn apart once more, but Ivy has no inkling of the other-worldly revelations about to unfold.

The Steep & Thorny Way

thesteepandthornywayDescription from Amazon: A thrilling reimagining of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, The Steep and Thorny Way tells the story of a murder most foul and the mighty power of love and acceptance in a state gone terribly rotten.

1920s Oregon is not a welcoming place for Hanalee Denney, the daughter of a white woman and an African American man. She has almost no rights by law, and the Ku Klux Klan breeds fear and hatred in even Hanalee’s oldest friendships. Plus, her father, Hank, died a year ago, hit by a drunk-driving teenager. Now the killer is out of jail and back in town, and he’s claiming that Hanalee’s father’s death wasn’t an accident at all. Instead, he says that Hank was poisoned by the doctor who looked after him—who just so happens to be Hanalee’s new stepfather.

In order to get the answers she needs, Hanalee will have to ask a “haint” wandering the roads at night—her father himself.

Yesternight

yesternightDescription from Goodreads: In 1925, Alice Lind steps off a train in the rain-soaked coastal hamlet of Gordon Bay, Oregon. There, she expects to do nothing more difficult than administer IQ tests to a group of rural schoolchildren. A trained psychologist, Alice believes mysteries of the mind can be unlocked scientifically, but now her views are about to be challenged by one curious child.

Seven-year-old Janie O’Daire is a mathematical genius, which is surprising. But what is disturbing are the stories she tells: that her name was once Violet, she grew up in Kansas decades earlier, and she drowned at age nineteen. Alice delves into these stories, at first believing they’re no more than the product of the girl’s vast imagination. But, slowly, Alice comes to the realization that Janie might indeed be telling a strange truth.

Alice knows the investigation may endanger her already shaky professional reputation, and as a woman in a field dominated by men she has no room for mistakes. But she is unprepared for the ways it will illuminate terrifying mysteries within her own past, and in the process, irrevocably change her life.

Slasher Girls & Monster Boys (An Anthology with Several Other Authors)

slashergirlsDescription from Goodreads: A host of the smartest young adult authors come together in this collection of scary stories and psychological thrillers curated by Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea’s April Genevieve Tucholke.

Each story draws from a classic tale or two—sometimes of the horror genre, sometimes not—to inspire something new and fresh and terrifying. There are no superficial scares here; these are stories that will make you think even as they keep you on the edge of your seat. From bloody horror to supernatural creatures to unsettling, all-too-possible realism, this collection has something for any reader looking for a thrill.


Have you given Cat Winters a try? Read any of the books I haven’t gotten to yet? What did you think?

In Other News…

So this past weekend, I drove an hour and a half by myself to a town I’d never been to before (HUGE deal for me) in order to FINALLY get to see my favorite artist during college perform live!

marylogoMary Prankster has been on hiatus for 12 whole years. So when I saw the announcement that she was doing “Pranksgiving 2017”, a pair of back-to-back of reunion shows, I HAD TO GO. Thankfully, the shows were near-ish to where I live and one of them was in a small town, Vienna VA. (The other one was in Baltimore and I HATE driving in Baltimore! Yea for small towns!)

The drive down was nerve-wracking, but the show itself more than made up for it! The two opening acts, Rodney Henry & Val Yumm were great. I’d never heard either of their music before, so I was very happy that I enjoyed all of it.

valyumm
Miss Val Yumm

Then Mary came on…and thank goodness my friends & I were standing right in front of the stage because the extremely exuberant crowd did NOT seem to have the same issues with personal space that I do. 😉 It was a blast though: singing at the top of our lungs, bopping in time, sharing jokes, and helping Mary remember her chords (lol).

mary1
Mary Prankster

Mary even came out after the show to sign posters and sat down right in front of me! She was extremely nice and was wonderful with chatting with all of her fans. She seemed astonished that we were all still so excited to see her show, considering the length of time since the last one (and extremely grateful that we were all willing to stand for the whole thing 😉 ).

maryall
We met Mary! 😀

It was a wonderful show and I’m glad I was able to finally experience Mary Prankster in real life.


Any of you ever heard of Mary Prankster? Ever go to a show? Tell me about it! 🙂

Here’s the link to her website if you want to know more: http://www.maryprankster.com/

Whatcha Readin?

Hey all! I’m currently in the middle of a couple of series, so I don’t have a full review for you today. Instead, I’m going to give you a quick glimpse into my current ‘To Read’ pile!

The Series:

Spellshadow Manor (Bella Forrest)

spellshadowMini Review: Well, I’m halfway through this series and still just as interested in the story as I was in Book 1 (see my review of that novel here). The character interactions sometimes seem a bit shallow and the kids’ decision making skills aren’t always the best, but it IS a middle grade-young adult series, similar in style to the early Harry Potters, so you can’t go into it expecting Shakespeare. The story line is intriguing, the action is edge-of-your-seat, and the writing is easy enough to read quickly. All in all, an entertaining series so far.

Creative Woman Mysteries (Annie’s Attic Publishing – Multiple Authors)

strandsoffateMini Review: I plan to do a full review of this series at some point, so for now I’ll just say that this is a fun cozy mystery series. The characters are all pleasant (except, you know, the bad guys), the pace and writing style are easy to follow, and the mysteries are intricate but not mind-bending. The main character, Shannon, drives me a little up the wall on occasion, but for a cozy mystery protagonist, she’s not bad. I’m really enjoying the series so far.

New from the Library:

Warcross (Marie Lu)

warcrossDescription from Goodreads: For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. Needing to make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire.

Bruno, Chief of Police (Martin Walker)

brunoDescription from Goodreads: Bruno is a former soldier who has embraced the pleasures and slow rhythms of country life — living in his restored shepherd’s cottage; patronizing the weekly market; sparring with, and basically ignoring, the European Union bureaucrats from Brussels. He has a gun but never wears it; he has the power to arrest but never uses it. But then the murder of an elderly North African who fought in the French army changes everything and galvanizes Bruno’s attention: the man was found with a swastika carved into his chest.

Because of the case’s potential political ramifications, a young policewoman is sent from Paris to aid Bruno with his investigation. The two immediately suspect militants from the anti-immigrant National Front, but when a visiting scholar helps to untangle the dead man’s past, Bruno’s suspicions turn toward a more complex motive. His investigation draws him into one of the darkest chapters of French history — World War II, a time of terror and betrayal that set brother against brother. Bruno soon discovers that even his seemingly perfect corner of la belle France is not exempt from that period’s sinister legacy.

“To Myself” birthday presents, waiting patiently in my TBR pile:

Turtles All The Way Down (John Green)

turtlesallthewaydownDescription from Goodreads: Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. 

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. 

The World of Lore: Monstrous Creatures (Aaron Mahnke)

loreDescription from Goodreads: They live in shadows–deep in the forest, late in the night, in the dark recesses of our minds. They’re spoken of in stories and superstitions, relics of an unenlightened age, old wives’ tales, passed down through generations. Yet no matter how wary and jaded we have become, as individuals or as a society, a part of us remains vulnerable to them: werewolves and wendigos, poltergeists and vampires, angry elves and vengeful spirits.

In this beautifully illustrated volume, the host of the hit podcast Lore serves as a guide on a fascinating journey through the history of these terrifying creatures, exploring not only the legends but what they tell us about ourselves. Aaron Mahnke invites us to the desolate Pine Barrens of New Jersey, where the notorious winged, red-eyed Jersey Devil dwells. He delves into harrowing accounts of cannibalism–some officially documented, others the stuff of speculation . . . perhaps. He visits the dimly lit rooms where seances take place, the European villages where gremlins make mischief, even Key West, Florida, home of a haunted doll named Robert.

In a world of “emotional vampires” and “zombie malls,” the monsters of folklore have become both a part of our language and a part of our collective psyche. Whether these beasts and bogeymen are real or just a reflection of our primal fears, we know, on some level, that not every mystery has been explained and that the unknown still holds the power to strike fear deep in our hearts and souls. As Aaron Mahnke reminds us, sometimes the truth is even scarier than the lore.

It Devours! (Joseph Fink & Jeffery Cranor)

itdevoursDescription from Goodreads: From the authors of the New York Times bestselling novel Welcome to Night Vale and the creators of the #1 international podcast of the same name, comes a mystery exploring the intersections of faith and science, the growing relationship between two young people who want desperately to trust each other, and the terrifying, toothy power of the Smiling God.

Nilanjana Sikdar is an outsider to the town of Night Vale. Working for Carlos, the town’s top scientist, she relies on fact and logic as her guiding principles. But all of that is put into question when Carlos gives her a special assignment investigating a mysterious rumbling in the desert wasteland outside of town. This investigation leads her to the Joyous Congregation of the Smiling God, and to Darryl, one of its most committed members. Caught between her beliefs in the ultimate power of science and her growing attraction to Darryl, she begins to suspect the Congregation is planning a ritual that could threaten the lives of everyone in town. Nilanjana and Darryl must search for common ground between their very different world views as they are faced with the Congregation’s darkest and most terrible secret.


So how about you? Any exciting book hauls lately? Did you pick up a couple fun books at the library?

What’s in YOUR ‘To Read’ pile?

Book Tag – Goodreads

I snagged this book tag from Kate over at Read, Eat, Retreat! 🙂

What was the last book you marked as read?

matchless
Matchless, A Christmas Story (Gregory Maguire) – I’m not usually a fan of Gregory Maguire, but this retelling of The Little Matchgirl was very sweet and not too depressing. 😉 I’d recommend it as a quick Christmas-y read.

What are you currently reading?

thelongearth
The Long Earth (Terry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter) – This sci-fi is an interesting take on what would happen if humans discovered a way to step between alternate universes. I’m really enjoying it so far!

What was the last book you marked as ‘to read’?

dearfahrenheit451

Dear Fahrenheit 451: A Librarian’s Love Letters and Break Up Notes to the Books in Her Life (Annie Spence) – As a bibliophile, I guess it’s completely natural for me to love books about books. 🙂 This one is a collection of love letters and break up notes from the author to books she either can’t live without or can’t wait to get rid of. Sounds fun!

Do you use the star rating system?
Yep! I know some people don’t like it, but I find it very useful.

Are you doing the 2017 Reading Challenge?
Yep! I’ve decided to run the Goodreads Challenge and the 2017 PopSugar Reading Challenge simultaneously. I’m attempting to read at least 60 books, while completing as many of the categories from PopSugar as I can. I’m not doing too badly either. 49 books down so far and 30 categories completed!

Do you have a wishlist?
No, my To-Read list is wishlist enough. 😉

Who are your favourite authors?
Hm…I’m always bad at this question. Currently I love Laini Taylor (Strange the Dreamer is probably my favorite book of the year so far). I also love Neil Gaiman and John Green. Joseph Fink & Jeffery Cranor from Welcome to Night Vale are also great!

Have you joined any groups?
I’ve meandered my way through a few groups. My current ones are:

Top 5 Wednesday
Cozy Mysteries
Friends of the Apparating Library Book Club
EVERYONE Has Read This But Me
Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge

How many Goodreads shelves do you have?
36 outside of the regular ‘Read’, ‘Currently Reading’, ‘To Read’, and ‘Did Not Finish’ shelves.

I tag…
Kristen from The Brunette Bookworm Blog!


I also tag anyone else who wants to do this one! Please link your post in the comments so I can check it out! 😀